Archive for the ‘Tips’ Category

Home Office Procrastinators, April 15th is Coming!!!

Tuesday, March 9th, 2010




Share

Home Office Procrastinators, April 15th is Coming!!!

-By your Staff Writer for the Property Network, Matt Giles

If you work from home, have an office or shop and are a procrastinator like me, April 15th is around the corner. I am a true procrastinator in every sense. If it wasn’t for my fiancé pushing and prodding me now, April 14th is the day I would be filing.

If you talk to your accountant there are things you can write off on your taxes for your home office. It all depends on who you talk to, what you can write off and if you should. Some believe it’s good to leave well enough alone and others will have you righting off the Pledge you buy to dust off your desk. This for me is not a write off, because you can’t see my desk under the pile of stuff (I told you I am a procrastinator, so filing and putting stuff away is not top on my list of things to do.).

First off you need an office in your home to be able to write it off. The IRS does not want to see that your office is also your living room. So if you have an office (with a desk, chair, computer, filing cabinet, and a couple of walls) you are in business. First step is to measure you office; whatever percentage of your office takes up that is the amount you can deduct off your taxes for a write off.

If you have a separate business line it’s a complete write off, but if you are sharing phone lines and utilities (electric) you can only write off a percentage. Figuring out the percentage is tricky. It might be best to just keep to whatever your space percentage write off is.

If you purchase a computer it is a write off the year you purchase. Printers, scanners, internet router, etc are all write offs. Make sure it is solely for your business. If it is a family computer by law you can’t write it off for your business.

Keep every receipt from Staples and highlight all purchases made towards the business. If you get audited it will be a tough sell to the IRS that you purchased the Barbie trapper-keeper and Transformer book bag for your business.

Really any and all supplies that you use to clean your office, run your office, fix things in your office are all tax write offs. Light bulbs, Windex, canned air to clean your keyboard,  serge protectors, paint if you painted your office, etc, add them all up because they are write offs!

Depending on your home based business you get different write off’s. When I worked at a radio station in Boston, I knew a DJ/Music programmer who wrote off every CD he bought, magazine subscription that came to his house, part of his cable bill, and anything else related to entertainment because it was all research for his radio show and radio station.

My number one advice is talk to your accountant about what they think is ok to write off. NOBODY wants to mess with the IRS. Just ask Al Capone, Willey Nelson, Martha Stuart and Wesly Snipes. Besides Al Capone (for obvious reasons) they would all say the IRS mean business.

-Matt Giles, Staff Writer for the Property Network, Freelance writer for hire. For more info visit www.mdgcopywriting.com



  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Home Office Procrastinators, April 15th is Coming!!! | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Home Office Procrastinators, April 15th is Coming!!! | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Home Office Procrastinators, April 15th is Coming!!! | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Home Office Procrastinators, April 15th is Coming!!! | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Home Office Procrastinators, April 15th is Coming!!! | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Home Office Procrastinators, April 15th is Coming!!! | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Home Office Procrastinators, April 15th is Coming!!! | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Home Office Procrastinators, April 15th is Coming!!! | CT Real Estate

lg share en Home Office Procrastinators, April 15th is Coming!!! | CT Real Estate

"I wasn't expecting that"

Wednesday, March 3rd, 2010




Share

3/1/10

“I wasn’t expecting that.”

-By your Staff Writer for the Property Network, Matt Giles

That what the homeowner said to my old boss when we told her we had to rip out her living room ceiling. We were hired to do an addition, kitchen and one bathroom renovation. Now we had to rip out her living room ceiling.

She was not happy at all about that. She called her husband in a panic. The reason we had to rip out the ceiling is because our electrician was chasing down old wires from other places in the house we demoed and was finding live wires behind the sheetrock.

Apparently the previous owner thought he was an electrician and decided to run wires all over the house incase he ever needed them there. The only thing was, the wires were tied into the electrical panel and were live. And live buried wires could leave you dead! That’s how fires start.

It would have been one thing if they were properly capped off with a wire nut in side an electrical box (even though by code you are not supposed to cover up an electrical box with out access to it). Nope this clown ran these wires and just taped off the ends and left them free floating in the ceiling.

So even after we explained everything to the homeowner she still needed to call her husband before we did anything. I understand that, it’s more work. My boss was a nice guy and told her that he would cover the labor if she paid for the sheetrock.  It was the safety of her family and technically by code she had too, but she made the right decision and said yes.

The point I am trying to make, is that with any renovation to your house, there could be surprises. You never know what you will get when you start opening up walls. By law if a contractor opens up your walls and finds violations of any kind they have to fix them.

So you might be wondering what they could possible find….Well if you have an old house you could find old cloth wires that fall apart to the touch. If you had any kind of major leaks over time (or the previous owners had the leaks), you could find rot in your framing that has to be fixed. Plumbing surprises are always fun! But don’t freak out, just plan ahead for them. In the trades they are called “extras” and they almost always happen on any job. You are not alone.  If you luck out your contractor may work with you on some of the cost. Maybe not, but either way the work has to be done.

-Matt Giles, Staff Writer for the Property Network, Freelance writer for hire. For more info visit www.mdgcopywriting.com



  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px "I wasn't expecting that" | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px "I wasn't expecting that" | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px "I wasn't expecting that" | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px "I wasn't expecting that" | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px "I wasn't expecting that" | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px "I wasn't expecting that" | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px "I wasn't expecting that" | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px "I wasn't expecting that" | CT Real Estate

lg share en "I wasn't expecting that" | CT Real Estate

Cheap Meat

Wednesday, March 3rd, 2010




Share

3/1/10

Cheap meat isn’t good and good meant isn’t cheap!

-By your Staff Writer for the Property Network, Matt Giles

That is almost the number one rule when hiring a contractor. You get what you pay for. If someone can do the job for $5,000 less than the other guy, more than likely he is cutting corners somewhere which could lead to a nightmare for you.

I was at an old friends mom’s house years ago and she had a sun room put on to the back of the house way before I was ever there. I was walking around and noticing that the room looked like it was sinking into the ground. She told me that was because the contractor never dug the footings to the required 3 feet deep, her sun room was slowly sinking. And because it took a few years to settle, it is going to be a major nightmare to fix that problem. Just to save a few hours and labor on digging holes and pouring cement she has a room that is sinking into the ground.

Don’t get me wrong, just because the contractor’s bill is the highest doesn’t mean he is the best. You should start your search by talking to people you know. If someone you trust is giving you a name of a good contractor, it’s a place to start (I would go over to your friend’s house and check out his work before picking up the phone).  Start with family and friends, than work your way down to a trusted realtor or neighbor.

Once you start talking to a contractor you are allowed to ask as many questions as you would like. In fact ask for a resume! I’m serious, ask for pictures, past client’s testimonials and than take it one step further and ask to talk to some previous clients. Most previous clients don’t mind taking that call after a major renovation to brag about their house and talk up their contractor.

Now, I know once you get a few bids from a few contractors you usually get sticker shock from the price. That causes a lot of people to wait or put the job on hold for a few months sometimes even a year. One thing to remember is that contractors who do any kind of major renovations set up their projects months in advance. The other thing to keep in mind is lumber yards and supply houses prices. They fluctuate with the price of gasoline (from their deliveries) and any other reason to raise the price. So the price of your materials can jump up in a month depending on the market.

Hiring a contractor for something like an addition can be very scary. You are trusting someone with thousands of your hard earned dollars, letting them into your home. They are usually there before breakfast and leave just before dinner, you tend to build a relationship with a contractor and that is why it is always good to find one you click with. We have all heard the contractor nightmares, so when you do find a good one, they are usually worth their weight in gold.

-Matt Giles, Staff Writer for the Property Network, Freelance writer for hire. For more info visit www.mdgcopywriting.com



  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Cheap Meat | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Cheap Meat | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Cheap Meat | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Cheap Meat | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Cheap Meat | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Cheap Meat | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Cheap Meat | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Cheap Meat | CT Real Estate

lg share en Cheap Meat | CT Real Estate

Economic Update – March 1, 2010

Monday, March 1st, 2010




Share

Last Week in the News


The Standard & Poor’s/Case-Shiller 20-city housing price index rose a seasonally adjusted 0.3% in December. It was the seventh consecutive monthly gain and follows a 0.2% increase in November.

The consumer confidence index fell to 46 in February from an upwardly revised 56.5 in January. Economists had anticipated a reading of 55. The index was benchmarked at 100 in 1985, a year chosen because it was neither a peak nor a trough in consumer confidence.

The Commerce Department reported new home sales fell 11.2% in January to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 309,000 units from a rate of 342,000 units in December. Economists had expected a pace of 354,000.

Initial claims for unemployment benefits rose by 22,000 to 496,000 in the week ending February 20. Continuing claims for the week ending February 13 rose by 6,000 to 4.617 million.

Orders for durable goods — items expected to last three or more years — rose 3% in January after a revised 1.9% increase in December. Excluding volatile transportation-related goods, orders posted a monthly decrease of 0.6%.

Existing home sales fell 7.2% in January to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.05 million units from 5.44 million units in December. The inventory of unsold homes on the market fell 0.5% to 3.27 million, a 7.8-month supply at the current sales pace, up from a 7.2-month supply in December and a 6.5-month supply in November.

The Commerce Department announced that gross domestic product — the total output of goods and services produced in the U.S. — increased at an annual rate of 5.9% in the fourth quarter of 2009, rather than the 5.7% increase initially reported last month.

Upcoming on the economic calendar are reports on construction spending on March 1, and factory orders and pending home sales on March 4.

Click here to visit my website and apply on line:
www.DavidJGarofalo.com


  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Economic Update   March 1, 2010 | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Economic Update   March 1, 2010 | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Economic Update   March 1, 2010 | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Economic Update   March 1, 2010 | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Economic Update   March 1, 2010 | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Economic Update   March 1, 2010 | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Economic Update   March 1, 2010 | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Economic Update   March 1, 2010 | CT Real Estate

lg share en Economic Update   March 1, 2010 | CT Real Estate

Is this a legally binding contract???

Monday, March 1st, 2010




Share

Modern technology is a wonderful thing, creating easy “connectivity” between people all over the nation. But it’s also causing problems in many areas, and buying Stamford real estate is one of them.

Here’s the problem: Many people selling Stamford real estate may live in another city or state. In this case, negotiations may be conducted over the phone, through email, via Yahoo conversations – some even use Twitter for real estate deals and information.

At the same time, this also means that legal documents may be passed through email, uploaded to a website for easy viewing or through any number of other online methods. PDF documents, for instance, have become a very popular way to pass on legal forms because they’re easy to fill out, don’t have to printed, etc.

As the buyer, you can’t afford to take the seller’s word that they’ve accepted your position – especially through email. For instance, a buyer recently had a home sale fall through. The seller accepted the terms through email, told the buyer that the seller had signed the contract and sent it on to the agent. Somehow, even though the buyer was positive the contract had been agreed upon, the house was sold to another buyer. Although laws change from state to state, it’s always best to have the contract in printed form, with an actual signature – in ink! Without the actual contract, all you have is an email.

Although emails can be legally binding, they don’t hold a candle to having the printed and signed contract in hand.

Here are a few tips to make sure your housing purchase goes off without a hitch:

• Meet in person – This may be a difficult prospect, especially if the seller lives out of state. However, if you can’t meet them in person, their agent should at least be local. Meeting with the home seller’s legal representative (i.e. Real estate agent) is the next best thing.

• Get it in writing, and get it in print – Who wants to wait for the post office to deliver a paper contract when you can get it from an email? Well… you do. Yes, it might slow the process of buying a house and closing the deal, but so will having the seller back out.

• Verify the important points – Make sure you and the seller really do agree on the terms of the contract before you put your signature on it. You, or preferably your buyer’s agent, should go over the contract with the seller’s agent who should go over it with the seller.

It’s a great time to buy Stamford real estate, but don’t let technology lose you the contract. Cross your t’s and dot your i’s – on paper!

If you’re looking to buy a home, I’ll make sure all those t’s are crossed and i’s are dotted for you. Call me at 203.667.0897 or email me at nicole@thepropnet.com for more information. icon smile Is this a legally binding contract??? | CT Real Estate

Nicole Borsey,  Broker/Owner



  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Is this a legally binding contract??? | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Is this a legally binding contract??? | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Is this a legally binding contract??? | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Is this a legally binding contract??? | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Is this a legally binding contract??? | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Is this a legally binding contract??? | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Is this a legally binding contract??? | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Is this a legally binding contract??? | CT Real Estate

lg share en Is this a legally binding contract??? | CT Real Estate

Home Improvement Tax Benefits for 2010

Friday, February 19th, 2010




Share

TopBar Auto Home Improvement Tax Benefits for 2010 | CT Real Estate
 Home Improvement Tax Benefits for 2010 | CT Real Estate Header HL Auto Home Improvement Tax Benefits for 2010 | CT Real Estate
BottomBar Red Auto Home Improvement Tax Benefits for 2010 | CT Real Estate
METROCITI David.Garofalo Home Improvement Tax Benefits for 2010 | CT Real Estate

David Garofalo

Senior Loan Officer
Prospect Mortgage
NMLS# 122111
100 Technology Dr., Suite 203
Trumbull, CT 06611
Office: (203) 910-1845
Fax: (877) 298-3986
David.Garofalo@prospectmtg.com
Button VisitMyWebsite HL Prospect Home Improvement Tax Benefits for 2010 | CT Real Estate
• Learn about home loans
• Use loan calculators
• Apply for a home loan
Referral Request:
Please forward my contact information to anyone you know with a need for real estate financing!
HBMButton HL Home Improvement Tax Benefits for 2010 | CT Real Estate
Home Improvement Tax
Benefits for 2010


For your clients, going green pays and saves. According to a study by the Joint Center for Housing Studies of Harvard University, for every dollar decrease in annual home energy expenditures, house values increase between $11.63 and $20.73.

Also, going green can lower the tax bill. New federal tax credits are now available for green home improvements on a principal residence. Qualifying modifications must meet a certain energy efficiency level to be eligible for the credit.

The credits are available for improvements purchased and in service from January 1, 2009, through December 31, 2010. The amount of the credit is deducted from any income taxes the homeowner may owe. The credit is nonrefundable, allowing taxpayers to lower their tax liability to zero, but not below zero.

Tax credits are available at 30% of the cost, up to $1,500, in 2009 through December 31, 2010 (for existing homes only) for:

  • Windows and Doors
  • Insulation
  • Roofs (Metal and Asphalt)
  • Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning (HVAC)
  • Water Heaters (non-solar)
  • Biomass Stoves

Tax credits are available at 30% of the cost, with no upper limit through December 31, 2016 (for existing homes and new construction) for:

  • Geothermal Heat Pumps
  • Solar Panels
  • Solar Water Heaters
  • Small Wind Energy Systems
  • Fuel Cells

Make sure your clients purchase products that come with a Manufacturer Certification Statement — a statement from the manufacturer that indicates the product qualifies for the tax credit. For record keeping, experts advise that homeowners retain all receipts.

Additional details can be found at www.energystar.gov/taxcreditsand www.homedepot.com/taxcredit

Click here to visit my website and apply on line:
www.DavidJGarofalo.com


  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Home Improvement Tax Benefits for 2010 | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Home Improvement Tax Benefits for 2010 | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Home Improvement Tax Benefits for 2010 | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Home Improvement Tax Benefits for 2010 | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Home Improvement Tax Benefits for 2010 | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Home Improvement Tax Benefits for 2010 | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Home Improvement Tax Benefits for 2010 | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Home Improvement Tax Benefits for 2010 | CT Real Estate

lg share en Home Improvement Tax Benefits for 2010 | CT Real Estate

The Hazards of Asbestos

Wednesday, February 17th, 2010




Share

The home buying process is an exciting time, but one that may bring additional responsibilities into your life. Having the assistance of an experienced and honest Connecticut real estate agent will make this process smooth and stress free. While the process of choosing a home is an exciting and rewarding time, additional repairs or renovations may be needed upon purchase. It is also a time where additional responsibilities will enter ones life.

Many older homes built prior to 1980 may still harvest obsolete and corrosive building materials which can create health concerns. Environmental efficiency is on the rise throughout the state because of technology and green building methods progressing rapidly.

Asbestos

Asbestos is a fibrous mineral that was utilized throughout the 20th century as an ideal form of insulation and piping in construction applications. Asbestos is often in old fireproofing, roofing, vinyl flooring, pipe and boiler insulation, and some roads and cement pipe and cement sheet products. Exposure to asbestos is easily avoidable by taking simple precautions.

Tips & Advice

It is not always an easy process to determine whether or not a particular insulation contains asbestos. If asbestos is located, it must be left un-touched until a professional can provide a course of action. In many situations, the best action is no action. Leaving it undisturbed is advisable as this will prevent its fibers from becoming airborne.

The Connecticut Department of Public Health administers an asbestos program that aims to reduce potential exposure to asbestos, including asbestos abatement and removal. This process should be undertaken by a licensed asbestos abatement contractor.

Asbestos exposure can lead to the development of a rare, but severe form of asbestos lung cancer known as mesothelioma. Current research indicates it can take as much as 20 to 50 years for this illness to develop. This makes accurate diagnosis a difficult task for physicians. Mesothelioma compensation has become tough to predict for victims and their families because diagnosis can take 20-50 years. For this reason, many people refer to it as a silent killer.

Going Green!

Green methods of building and construction have become a prominent aspect of Connecticut’s communities. Implementing green methods of building can have positive environmental, health and economic benefits. These include: Conservation of natural resources, enhance air quality, protect Eco systems, energy sustainability, increase property value, improve quality of life, improvement of pulmonary and cardiac health, Reduction of waste.

Green building is the consequence of a design that will increase energy efficiency, water and have a direct impact on your health and the environment. In a recent article published by Reuters, the green building movement has been steadily increasing. However, home owners feeling the financial crunch have been un-decided about going green because of fiscal reasons. Going green can and will have several positive economic benefits.

Cotton fiber, cellulose and lcynene, water based spray polyurethane foam are all viable replacements to asbestos. Cotton fiber is quickly becoming a favorite for home builders and renovators. Made from recycled batted material, it is also treated to be fireproof. Research has demonstrated that the use of Eco-friendly insulation alternatives can reduce annual energy costs by 25 percent. These green options have the same beneficial qualities as asbestos, minus the health deteriorating and toxic components.



  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px The Hazards of Asbestos | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px The Hazards of Asbestos | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px The Hazards of Asbestos | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px The Hazards of Asbestos | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px The Hazards of Asbestos | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px The Hazards of Asbestos | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px The Hazards of Asbestos | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px The Hazards of Asbestos | CT Real Estate

lg share en The Hazards of Asbestos | CT Real Estate

Kick the Tires, Check under the Hood, You’re Ready to Buy.

Tuesday, January 26th, 2010




Share

-By your local Stamford Connecticut Real Estate Broker, Nicole Borsey at The Property Network

Congratulations, You are ready to buy a home in Stamford! Buying a home is one of the most exciting things you can accomplish. There is the thrill of the hunt, applying for the mortgage, attorney review, all the elements that make the process exhilarating.

Just like buying a car, you want to check out the make, model, kick the tires, check under the hood of your potential new home.  Most of the time you have to find the right dealer and for home buying that is finding the right realtor. Your realtor should understand your wants and needs in a home and take all of your requirements into consideration.

There are many different makes and models of homes, just like cars. Being open minded is key for finding the right home. Ranches, cape cods, condos, town houses, Victorians, etc, are all out there and maybe even in the area you are looking.  If the place is in your price range and in the area you want to live, take the time to visit the home, because you never know what you might find.

First things first, when buying a house….where do you want to live? In a town (obviously Stamford or close by)? The middle of nowhere? On a hill? By the water? Near a school? Within 5 minutes of a Starbucks? Narrowing down these decisions will make the start of the process easier.   School districts, easy commute to work, and property tax are all things to think about when buying.

What features does your dream home have? Fireplace, walk out basement, a yard, a public place for the kids to play, a driveway, a great view, what does your dream home have that no others have. For some people the difference between buying and not buying a home is hardwood floors over a rug. Knowing the hard to change things (like a putting in a fireplace or driveway) will help build your check list of must haves.

Don’t forget to check for dings and dents. Does the house need a roof? Does the house need a new septic system? What is a septic system and how much does it cost to replace? Are their cracks in foundation, sidewalks sinking? All things to look for and think about before you buy. Some of these things are quick fixes and some can be quite costly.
Is it roomy enough for you? Literally, is there enough room? Will one bathroom cut it? How many bedrooms do you need? Is one bedroom enough space for you or are you planning on having kids in the future and need something with more room? Do you need a lot of storage space? For the shop-aholics are the closets big enough to store your clothes? Additions can be expensive so if you know these things ahead of time factor them in while comparing houses.

Paint colors, central air, trim moldings are all things that can be added after you move in. Where the home is, the amenities you can’t live with out, storage; style, etc are the starting points when you are ready to buy.  Your home is a BIG purchase and deserves a lot of careful thought and consideration, but is with out of a doubt one of the most exciting investments you can make.

Stamford Connecticut is the home of Property Network. We want make Stamford your home too!



  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Kick the Tires, Check under the Hood, You’re Ready to Buy. | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Kick the Tires, Check under the Hood, You’re Ready to Buy. | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Kick the Tires, Check under the Hood, You’re Ready to Buy. | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Kick the Tires, Check under the Hood, You’re Ready to Buy. | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Kick the Tires, Check under the Hood, You’re Ready to Buy. | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Kick the Tires, Check under the Hood, You’re Ready to Buy. | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Kick the Tires, Check under the Hood, You’re Ready to Buy. | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Kick the Tires, Check under the Hood, You’re Ready to Buy. | CT Real Estate

lg share en Kick the Tires, Check under the Hood, You’re Ready to Buy. | CT Real Estate

Exit Stage Left: Help sell your house through the art of staging.

Tuesday, January 26th, 2010




Share

-By your local Stamford Connecticut Real Estate Broker, Nicole Borsey at the Property Network

To Stage or not to Stage that is the question, and I’m telling you right now, Staging is the answer. Staging transforms your home into a house and then takes it from a house to a home for the potential buyer. Confused???  Read on…

When you first make the decision to sell your home, more times than not, you start with a good cleaning. You work your way from top to bottom. Anywhere from the basement to the garage, it all has to be spotless. Don’t get me wrong, a good cleaning is necessary, but you have to do more than just clean out the cob webs and dust balls under the couch. You have to clean the walls, patch nail holes, and start to set the stage.

Begin cleaning off the walls by taking down all of your family photos and touching up the holes with some spackle and paint. This leaves the potential buyer with a blank canvas effect. One or two neutral pictures on the wall will never hurt, but having all of the pictures from last year’s family reunion leaves your stamp. You don’t want that, you want the buyer to walk in and see themselves in the space. You want them to feel like they are at home. Their home, not yours!

Location, location, location! You must relocate any clutter. If your house has clutter in any rooms, clean it out! You want to maximize your room space. Clutter gives off the feeling that a room is smaller than it really is. It also leads the buyer to believe that the house lacks storage space. If you can’t bear to part with the items that are causing the clutter, then organize it. Buy bins and find a nice neat place to store your personal belongings for now, like a corner in the basement or the garage.

There are plenty of high traffic areas in your house and you want these clear too. Extra furniture and furnishings fill up a room quickly. You have to find your center and think Feng Shui. You want your rooms to flow and extra furniture and knick knacks can block that flow. You want to give the feel of open space in these high traffic areas. Otherwise, it can cut off your room and make it feel like the room is small and closed off.

We all have “good sides” and so does each room in your house. You want to show off all the “good sides” and highlight any special features. If there is a corner in your living room that is a cozy spot for reading, set it up for just that. Stage the space with a comfortable chair, a side table with a lamp and a place book on it as well. Make the buyer believe that is where you read every night. If you have a play room in the basement, set it up as an organized play area, with games and a few toys out. It’s all about showing off the potential of your home to buyers.

If you follow these few steps, you’ll transform your home (with your pictures, memories and clutter) to a house (full of potential for a new buyer). This in turn will open up your house to become the future home of someone else. Sounds simple, right???

Stamford Connecticut is the home of The Property Network. We want make Stamford your home too!



  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Exit Stage Left: Help sell your house through the art of staging. | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Exit Stage Left: Help sell your house through the art of staging. | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Exit Stage Left: Help sell your house through the art of staging. | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Exit Stage Left: Help sell your house through the art of staging. | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Exit Stage Left: Help sell your house through the art of staging. | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Exit Stage Left: Help sell your house through the art of staging. | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Exit Stage Left: Help sell your house through the art of staging. | CT Real Estate
  • wp socializer sprite mask 16px Exit Stage Left: Help sell your house through the art of staging. | CT Real Estate

lg share en Exit Stage Left: Help sell your house through the art of staging. | CT Real Estate